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Media Limitations In Reporting Crimes Against Humanity

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Chapter Summary

This chapter explains media limitations in reporting crimes against humanity. For those of you interested in the punishment of crimes against humanity, that means an important but constrained role for the press. The press can be a watchdog sniffing out suspicious, even blood-curdling situations. The press can bark, as it is wont to do. But it should not bark in a judgmental way that a crime against international humanitarian law has occurred. That is for others to declare and enforce, such as governments, the United Nations, or international prosecutors and courts. The press has become moralistic, as the author has seen in the frenzy over whether a President may have done something sexual with a White House intern. He suspects there is a touch of moralism in all reporters; indeed, that is one reason they entered into journalism.

Keywords: crimes against humanity; international humanitarian law; journalism; media limitations; moralism



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