Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Monsters March On

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this chapter

+ Tax (if applicable)

Chapter Summary

The material cultural display of the Japanese Galleries of the British Museum incorporates manga display within its Modern Japan section. Yōkai and mononoke are supernatural entities that grew out of folk beliefs related to phenomena that induced fear, including sudden misfortunes, famines, diseases, social outcasts or unexplainable events. During the Edo to Meiji periods, ukiyo-e woodblock print representations of the monsters increased, displaying a wide range of artistic expression. The extent of influence of Edo and Meiji period visual sources on the character design of the animated series seems to support Murakami's view regarding the fluidity between visual genres in Japanese art history, while positioning the Gegegeno Kitaro animated series within the framework of Japanese art history from the perspective of Murakami's Superflat theory. Besides visual media, taking a look at the contemporary yōkai landscape also produces interesting findings.

Keywords: Edo period; Gegegeno Kitaro; Japan; manga display; Meiji period; monsters; Murakami; Superflat theory; Yōkai

10.1163/ej.9781906876180.i-180.92
/content/books/10.1163/ej.9781906876180.i-180.92
dcterms_subject,pub_keyword
6
3
Loading

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Anime and Its Roots in Early Japanese Monster Art — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation