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Chapter Summary

This chapter describes the basics of Ozone layer and its depletion and Climatic change. The theory of a natural balance of the ozone layer is thrown into disarray by the damage caused by Ozone Depleting Substances (ODS). The chemical phenomenon at the root of the ODS theory is the ability of small amounts of chlorine or bromine to destroy ozone in quantity. The pre-industrial level of atmospheric chlorine is believed to have been 0.6 parts per billion (ppb). This concentration was due to naturally occurring methyl chloride. Anthropogenic climate change is caused by 'greenhouse gases'. Although the twentieth century began with a period of relative temperature stability, the global average surface temperature had increased by about 0. 6°C by the end of the century.

Keywords: atmospheric chlorine; climatic change; greenhouse gas; ozone depleting substances (ODS); ozone layer

10.1163/ej.9789004145207.i-405.9
/content/books/10.1163/ej.9789004145207.i-405.9
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