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Why Are You Called A Christian? Question 32 Of The Heidelberg Catechism

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Chapter Summary

Heidelberg Catechism (HC) is one of the sources, which answers the question Why Are You Called a Christian? The answer points to the prophetic, priestly, and kingly offices of a Christian as a derivation of the triple office of Christ. A Christian is a human being who belongs to Christ. The term 'Christians' does not refer to a political or social group, but to people who had one similarity; that they believed in Jesus Christ and lived in relation to Him. The Holy Spirit with whom Christ was anointed flows over from Christ to the faithful and they can be Christians only in that way. A Christian is a free master over all things and subject to no one. One must be daily converted through the belief in Jesus Christ in order to exercise this triple office in concrete situations.

Keywords: Christian; Heidelberg Catechism; Jesus Christ; triple office

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