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King and community: Joining with David in prayer

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Chapter Summary

The psalms have been the core of the prayer life of the Church over its entire history, and one could say the same for the Synagogue in different but not unrelated ways. Some have argued for a significant place for David the king and royal theology in the shaping and interpretation of the whole Psalter. This chapter illustrates the ways in which the hearer/reader is drawn into the psalms to make them their own prayers and songs. It focuses on the beginning of the Psalter to show that this process is evident, contrary to Gerald Wilson’s argument. The close associations of adjacent psalms or small groups early in the Psalter could be developed. The prayers of David, prayed later again as the prayers of the community of faith, became the vehicle whereby that community found identity, hope and new life.

Keywords: Gerald Wilson; prayers of David; psalms; royal theology

10.1163/ej.9789004160323.i-306.80
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