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Religious War, Terrorism, And Peace

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Chapter Summary

The assault on commuter trains in Madrid, the World Trade Centre attack in New York City, the release of nerve gas in subways in Tokyo, all of these are incidents of terrorism, and all of them are linked with religion. Religion has been a factor in terrorism in virtually every religious tradition and not just Islam. A Christian terrorist, Timothy McVeigh, bombed the Oklahoma City Federal Building. A Jewish activist, Yigal Amir, assassinated Israel's Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin. A Buddhist prophet, Shoko Asahara, orchestrated the unleashing of nerve gas in the Tokyo subways near the Japanese parliament buildings. Hindu and Sikh militants have targeted government buildings and political leaders in India. These and many other incidents force us to raise the question of whether religion leads to violence or peace.

Keywords: India; Madrid; New York City; peace; terrorism; Tokyo; World Trade Centre

10.1163/ej.9789004161238.i-306.7
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