Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Luther And Müntzer See Mary's Magnificat Through Different Spectacles

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this chapter

+ Tax (if applicable)

Chapter Summary

The priorities of the two interpretations of the Magnificant by Martin Luther and of Luke 1 by Thomas Müntzer are very different in deed. By drawing on Jeremiah 9:22-23, with its sharp criticism of glorifying in wisdom, might and riches Luther could highlights "the proud" in Luke 1, recognizing in Mary's song his own experiences with the pope and his followers. For him, the song of Mary teaches the right manner of believing. By drawing on quotations from, among other things, Ezekiel, Jeremiah and Isaiah, Müntzer claims to have been called by God him self to lead the simple Christians to understand what belief really means. A Christian can believe only after passing through fear, trembling and affliction. According to Müntzer, Luther is guilty of proffering an easy form of belief and stealing away the Bible from the common man.

Keywords: Bible; Jeremiah; Luke; Martin Luther; Mary's song; Thomas Müntzer

10.1163/ej.9789004161726.i-476.51
/content/books/10.1163/ej.9789004161726.i-476.51
dcterms_subject,pub_keyword
6
3
Loading

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Politics and Reformations: Histories and Reformations — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation