Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Iranian Glass Perfume Vessel From The Pichvnari Greek Cemetery Of The Fifth Century BC

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this chapter

+ Tax (if applicable)

Chapter Summary

Polychrome glass perfume vessels occupy a significant place among the grave goods discovered at the 5th century BC Greek cemetery at Pichvnari. Of the polychrome glass perfume vessels special attention is attached to the so-called Kohl-tubes. The Kohl-tube is alien to the Greek world, which is evident from the limits in their area of distribution. The northwestern Iran is supposed to be the centre of their manufacture. The Kohl-tubes were imported into Colchis by land through eastern Georgia. In the classical as well as Hellenistic periods close direct trade, economic and cultural contacts existed between the regions of eastern Georgia and the Iranian world. This is obvious not only according to glassware, but from other data of material culture as well, especially, specimens of glyptics and architecture.

Keywords: Colchis; Eastern Georgia; Greek cemetery; Hellenistic period; Iranian Kohl-tubes; Pichvnari; polychrome glass perfume vessels

10.1163/ej.9789004163287.i-172.34
/content/books/10.1163/ej.9789004163287.i-172.34
dcterms_subject,pub_keyword
6
3
Loading

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Achaemenid Culture and Local traditions in Anatolia, Southern Caucasus and Iran — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation