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Xenophon Of Ephesus

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Chapter Summary

In many important respects Xenophon’s handling of time is like Chariton’s. Arguments that our version of the Ephesiaca is an epitome have been vigorously rebutted, but the sense remains for many readers that something fuller and more satisfactory lurks behind the extant text. The most important function of narratorial analepsis is to effect transitions between and co-ordinate the separate narrative threads. The prolepses can be divided into a number of categories: (a) narratorial prolepses; (b) prolepses implied by the intentions of the divine; (c) prophetic dreams and oracles; (d) actorial prolepses; (e) seeds. Xenophon’s handling of time is, like Chariton’s, rather simple, and for the most part time is not thematised or emphasised. In some aspects, such as prolepsis, there may also be issues of incompetence or epitomisation.

Keywords: Chariton; Ephesus; narrative; prolepses; Xenophon

10.1163/ej.9789004165069.i-542.177
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