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Chapter Summary

This book shows that Euripidean women express themselves in ways that are very distinct from men. Women are repeatedly shown engaged in intimate conversations, sharing knowledge to which men have no access. Women abound in female solidarity and appeal to each other on the basis of common female interests; this kind of interaction is never available to tragic men. The book argues that song signals more than mere excited emotion, but indeed communicates what is important to the singer. Throughout his corpus, Euripides' interest in women as tragic characters is grounded in his representation of women possessing particular experiences not shared by men. Euripides points to women's commonality by the use of song, silences, apologies, and intimate conversations as significant female modes of communication; but he also individualizes each of his female characters by appealing to their unique experiences and reactions to tragic crises.

Keywords: Euripidean women; Euripides; silence; solidarity; song

10.1163/ej.9789004168800.i-263.35
/content/books/10.1163/ej.9789004168800.i-263.35
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