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Muslims In Canon Law, 650-1000

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Chapter Summary

Canon law, the religious law of the Church, is an amorphous body of normative literature whose contents and contours differ from one Christian community to the next. This chapter focuses primarily on legal literature in Latin, Greek, and Syriac, which is to say the canon law of the Roman Catholic, Greek Orthodox (Chalcedonian), Syrian Orthodox (Jacobite), and Church of the East (Nestorian) traditions. The fact that other branches of Christianity receive less attention reflects both the authors linguistic limitations and the emphases of canon law scholarship more broadly. Christians first encountered Muslims as invaders. Jacob of Edessa, however, permits offering communion to Christian women who marry Hagarenes, lest they choose to convert to Islam. Christians do not grant Muslims comparable symbolic significance and do not employ terms such as paganizing, saracenizing, or the like.

Keywords: canon law; Christian-Muslim relation; Hagarene; Islam; Jacob of Edessa; pagan; Saracen law; Syrian Orthodox Patriarch

10.1163/ej.9789004169753.i-960.34
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