Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Orality And Autobiography: The Case Of The Res Gestae

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this chapter

+ Tax (if applicable)

Chapter Summary

In the ongoing debates over the nature of the Augustan imperial settlement, however, discussion of the form of the Res Gestae as an act of communication has usually been pushed to the background, as has its importance as autobiography, however brief. Although Augustus' own words more than once acknowledge the status of the Res Gestae as writing, the first person mode of discourse seems to position the text somewhere between the oral and the written. There is one apparent exception to the general tendency to refer to this work only briefly: one and only one extensive direct quotation commonly attributed to the Commentaries. Ironies survived only because it was both transported to and translated in one of the provinces, there to outlast almost every trace of Augustus earlier Autobiography or Commentaries. Through a re-imagined first-person orality, Augustus recounts and justifies the public self he created in an enduringly compelling autobiography.

Keywords: Augustan imperial settlement; Augustus' Autobiography; first-person orality; Res Gestae

10.1163/ej.9789004169913.i-284.56
/content/books/10.1163/ej.9789004169913.i-284.56
dcterms_subject,pub_keyword
6
3
Loading

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Orality, Literacy, Memory in the Ancient Greek and Roman World — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation