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Human~Divine Communication As A Paradigm For Power: Al-Tha'Labï'S Presentation Of Q. 38:24 And Q. 38:34

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Chapter Summary

Muslim historiography constructs a salvation history, built out of a series of anecdotes regarding the pre-Islamic prophets, some independently authored and some re-worded by the compiler of the history, all arranged in a loosely chronological pattern. Al-Thaʿlabī’s eleventh century historiographical text is arguably the most comprehensive and most influential text of its genre regarding the pre-Islamic prophets, and this chapter concentrates on the discourse patterns between God and His prophet within the David and the Solomon narratives, and on the resultant indications of the nature of the power relationships between God and David, God and Solomon, within this text. God's presence in the Solomon story can also be read in the prophet's reaction to the perceived threat of God's anger.

Keywords: Al-Thaʿlabī’s; David; pre-Islamic prophets; Solomon story

10.1163/ej.9789004177529.i-536.41
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