Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Images Of Abraham And G-D In A Jewish Reading Of Genesis

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this chapter

+ Tax (if applicable)

Chapter Summary

The publication of Bruce Feiler's, Abraham: A Journey to the Heart of Three Faiths, opens the long-standing question of Abraham's role as the founder of western monotheism in general and his foundational roles in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Readers recognize that Abraham commands great interest in each of the three monotheistic traditions because of his relationship with G-d. By raising questions concerning G-d's fidelity to the covenant with Abraham, the Abraham/Sarah narratives in Genesis 11:27-25:11 provide the reader with an opportunity to reflect the questions of divine evil, including the potential for exile and loss of land, in Jewish tradition. Genesis 12-14 then provides a detailed picture of Abram and his interaction with G-d. Finally, Genesis 21 presents the birth of Isaac to Sarah and Abraham, resolving the literary tensions surrounding Sarah's barrenness and G-d's unfulfilled promises of a son.

Keywords: Abraham/Sarah narrative; birth of Isaac; Bruce Feiler; Christianity; G-d; Genesis; Islam; Judaism; western monotheistic tradition

10.1163/ej.9789004177529.i-536.43
/content/books/10.1163/ej.9789004177529.i-536.43
dcterms_subject,pub_keyword
6
3
Loading

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Sacred Tropes: Tanakh, New Testament, and Qur'an as Literature and Culture — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation