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Referencing Isis In Tombs Of Graeco-Roman Egypt: Tradition And Innovation

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Chapter Summary

Amid the multifarious deities populating Graeco-Roman tombs, Isis appears frequently and prominently, for both in Alexandria and the Egyptian chora she retains a principal role in the negotiation of the afterlife. In both Alexandria and in tombs of the Egyptian chora, Isis most often performs the traditional role inherited from her eschatological function in pharaonic Egypt. At Tuna el-Gebel, for example, in the stylistically hybrid early-Ptolemaic tomb of Petosiris, priest of Thoth, dated to ca. 300 BCE on the basis of the biographical information it contains, Isis plays a relatively minor role. In the Dachla Oasis, the cemetery site of el-Muzawwaqa that served the Roman city of Trimithis yields the tombs of Petubastis and Petosiris, both of which are probably to be dated to the first century CE, and both of which are among the most highly decorated and best preserved Roman-period tombs in Egypt.

Keywords:Dachla Oasis; Egyptian chora; Graeco-Roman tombs; Isis; Tuna el-Gebel

10.1163/ej.9789004188822.i-364.30
/content/books/10.1163/ej.9789004188822.i-364.30
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