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Omnis Fibra Ex Fibra: Fibre Economies In Bonnet’s And Diderot’s Models Of Organic Order

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Chapter Summary

This chapter examines the function of visualizations and practices in the formation of the reflex concept from Thomas Willis to Marshall Hall. It focuses on the specific form of reflex knowledge that images and practices can contain. In addition, the chapter argues that it is through visual representations and experimental practices that technical knowledge is transferred to the field of human reflex physiology. When using technical metaphors in human physiology authors often seem to feel obliged to draw distinctions between humans, machines and animals. On closer scrutiny, these distinctions sometimes fail to establish firm borders between the human and the technical.

Keywords:human physiology; Marshall Hall; Robert Whytt; Thomas Willis

10.1163/ej.9789004191815.i-200.16
/content/books/10.1163/ej.9789004191815.i-200.16
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    Transitions and Borders between Animals, Humans and Machines 1600-1800 — Recommend this title to your library
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