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God As Refuge And Temple As Refuge In The Psalms

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Chapter Summary

This chapter explores what the temple meant in the religious ideology of ancient Israelites. It examines the descriptions of God as refuge in the Psalms alongside descriptions of the temple as a place of refuge. As William P. Brown demonstrates, refuge is a "foundational metaphor" in the Psalter. As part of his pursuit of the metaphor's wide-ranging associations, Brown himself has already noted that the idea of God as refuge is "concretely embodied in Zion". The identification of asylum terminology in the Psalms began with a number of studies of Psalm 27, including one by the Israeli historian Benẓion Dinur, who saw it as the reflection of "the ceremony of admission" into the refuge cities. The idea of the temple as refuge adds a new dimension to Anderson's emphasis on "the locus of praise".

Keywords: Anderson; God as refuge; Psalms; temple as refuge

10.1163/ej.9789004192539.i-405.11
/content/books/10.1163/ej.9789004192539.i-405.11
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