Cookies Policy

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Preliminary Material

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this chapter

+ Tax (if applicable)

Chapter Summary

José Casanova starts his book Public religions in the modern world with the statement 'Religion in the 1980's went public'. The strong version of secularization was already weakening when the role of religion was seen as a cultural archive providing symbols and opinions, at least latently, for textual and pictorial symbols in music, literature, film, architecture and so forth. The main objective of Casanova's work is to confirm the thesis that religion is in 'a process of de-privatization'. The term 'in a process' suggests that religions have been privatized in the past and that now they are back on the tracks to public significance. The concept of functional differentiation is related to the concept of privatization. The reflection on the public significance of religion has to include a global perspective. A descriptive approach to the phenomenon of the public significance of religion is, from the theological and cultural perspective, incomplete.

Keywords: José Casanova; privatization; public significance of religion; secularization



Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
    The Public Significance of Religion — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation