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Epilogue: Is There Room for Sustainable Architecture?

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Chapter Summary

The mosques of Futa Toro are characteristically devoid of any added element such as minaret and dome. Since the Tukolor Empire has been safely confined to the realm of history, new requirements dictate a different approach to making mosques: larger populations, the presence of women, ablution facilities, annexes for libraries and a private room for the Imam are all seen as being integral parts of the mosque. In the rural context of Futa Toro, with mosques built to serve small communities mainly for the ritual of prayer, it was the space outside the mosque - under the palaver tree or the hangar - that acted as teaching or meeting places. In conformity with the policy of assimilation in vogue between 1848 and the end of the 19th century, the monumental mosques of Saint-Louis and Dakar as well as the numerous turuq mosques follow the colonial house model characterised by the front porch or veranda.

Keywords:Dakar; Futa Toro; monumental mosques; Saint-Louis

10.1163/9789004217508_008
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