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Philosophy and Mysticism

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Chapter Summary

The dichotomy between Jewish philosophy and the Kabbalah and their academic and scholarly treatment as two mutually exclusive domains has been recently criticized from several quarters and the Kabbalah and their academic and scholarly treatment as two mutually exclusive domains has been recently criticized from several quarters. Although it is true that philosophy and mysticism have drawn water from different wells, in the final analysis the distinction between philosophy as such and mysticism as such is no greater than the distinction between any two philosophical schools, and, the various philosophical schools and trends take issue with one another on almost everything. The most important distinction between philosophy and mysticism is that between what Aquinas terms in the Summa Theologiae, cognitio dei experimentalis, i.e., the knowledge of God through experience, and what Spinoza - one of the greatest anti-mystics of all time-calls amor dei intellectualis, the intellectual love of God.

Keywords:Jewish philosophy; Kabbalah; mysticism

10.1163/9789004217713_008
/content/books/b9789004217713s008
dcterms_subject,pub_keyword
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