Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Introduction

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this chapter

+ Tax (if applicable)

Chapter Summary

The primary visual images for Christians of the Roman Empire after Constantine were simple symbols of religious identity: the monogram of Christ or the cross. Sophisticated narrative art illustrating stories of the Bible also presents unambiguous declarations of Christian identity. Mosaics and frescoes are heavily used in art-historical studies, but African Red Slip Ware (ARS) and a related product, African lamps, have been a much less exploited source for late antique imagery. The main phase of figural relief decoration on ARS, about 350-430ce, provides insight into Christian art of the time of the Roman catacombs and pagan art in some of its latest manifestations. The presence of pagan imagery on these lamps provides interesting metrics on the survival of such themes in a Christianized world. Biblical, non-biblical, Judeo-Christian, mythic, and secular themes may appear on ARS, and on occasion peculiarly North African texts lie behind the imagery.

Keywords: African red slip ware (ARS); Christianized world; pagan imagery; religious identity; Roman Empire

10.1163/9789004256934_002
/content/books/b9789004256934_002
dcterms_subject,pub_keyword
6
3
Loading

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Pottery, Pavements, and Paradise — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation