Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Horror, Humour, Fiends and Fools

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this chapter

+ Tax (if applicable)

Chapter Summary

A method of defence that corresponds to class struggle conducted 'from above' is one in which humour replaces horror, weakness replaces strength, and landlords or colonialism are presented as disempowered instead of empowered. If one conceptualizes the empowered/disempowered dichotomy structuring the opposition between humour and horror in political terms, it could be said to adhere to some pattern. Socialists would argue that those who rule by virtue of monarchy/aristocracy/colonialism are indeed powerful, while those who are ruled as a consequence of the existence and reproduction of these relational/institutional/systemic forms are disempowered. In contrast to the image of 'fiend' and 'friend', landowners portrayed as 'fools' are absolved from having to lead the nation, since the inference is that they are incapable of doing so through no fault of their own. The royalty, landowners and colonizers are shown to be powerful and benign, 'those above' being friendly towards 'those below'.

Keywords: aristocracy; colonialism; fiend; fools; horror; humour; monarchy; socialists

10.1163/9789004273948_006
/content/books/b9789004273948s006
dcterms_subject,pub_keyword
10
5
Loading

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Class, Culture and the Agrarian Myth — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation