Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

SPATIAL GENETIC STRUCTURE IN POPULATIONS OF HOSTA CAPITATA AND HOSTA MINOR (LILIACEAE)

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Israel Journal of Plant Sciences

The spatial distribution of genotypes was examined in each of two populations of Hosta capitata and H. minor using spatial autocorrelation analysis of enzyme polymorphisms. Although these two species have a similar life history and similar ecological traits, this study indicates that the pattern of spatial genetic distribution in the species differed. The percentage of significant Moran's I for all distance classes differs (20% and 14% in H. capitata; 33% and 53% in H. minor). Significant positive Moran's I values were detected in the shorter distance classes for H. capitata (distance class 1–3, 0–4.5 m), whereas these values for H. minor were observed in longer distance classes (distance classes 5–6, 0–10.4 m). Approximate minimum patch area for H, capitata (7–20 m2) is smaller than that of H. minor (38–78 m2). As the weights of seeds are nearly the same in both species and seedlings grow near maternal individuals in both species, and gene flow via seed is expected to be at the same level, the observed difference in patterns of spatial genetic distribution may in part be due to the differences between both species in terms of the extent of gene flow via pollen dispersal, selective forces, and other unknown factors of their reproductive biology.

Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology, Gyeongsang National University mgchung@nongae.gsnu.ac.kr ; 2: Department of Horticulture, Ansung National University

10.1080/07929978.1998.10676726
/content/journals/10.1080/07929978.1998.10676726
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
10
5
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1080/07929978.1998.10676726
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1080/07929978.1998.10676726
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1080/07929978.1998.10676726
1998-05-13
2018-06-25

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Israel Journal of Plant Sciences — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation