Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Seasonal variation in diel and tidal effects among benthic amphipods with different lifestyles in a sandy surf zone of Korea

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

image of Crustaceana

[Although endogenous rhythms such as diel and tidal effects can influence the distribution of sandy beach amphipods, the consequences of these for the seasonal endogenous rhythms of amphipods within the subtidal surf zone of sandy beaches are little understood. We examined the seasonal variation in diel and tidal effects among benthic amphipods with different lifestyles in a sandy shore surf zone in southern Korea. Using a sledge net, quantitative samples of amphipods were taken for 24 h at three stations: at the bottom and surface at a water depth of 1 m, and at the water's edge. The epifaunal, nestling amphipods, Pontogeneia rostrata Gurjanova, 1938 and Allorchestes angusta Dana, 1856 and the burrower, Haustorioides koreanus Jo, 1988 were significantly more abundant at the surface at night than during the day, suggesting nocturnal vertical migration. However, the abundance of the burrower, Synchelidium lenorostralum Hirayama, 1986 did not change between day and night, suggesting that this species did not perform vertical migrations. Most of the amphipods, particularly P. rostrata, showed a seasonally different response to tidal effects, appearing at higher densities during ebbing than flooding tides in one or more seasons, and depending on the species. Amphipods increased in abundance at night regardless of seasonal tidal variation, suggesting that the diel effect may be more important than the tidal effect. Seasonal variation to diel and tidal effects by these amphipods varied with temperature and different lifestyles. Bien que des rythmes endogènes tels que les effets journaliers ou tidaux peuvent influencer la distribution des amphipodes des plages sableuses, leurs conséquences sur les rythmes endogènes des amphipodes de la zone infra-tidale ou des plages sableuses sont peu comprises. Nous avons examiné les variations saisonnières des effets journaliers et tidaux parmi les amphipodes benthiques avec différents styles de vie dans la zone de ressac d'une plage sableuse au sud de la Corée. A l'aide d'un filet traînant des échantillons quantitatifs d'amphipodes ont été prélevés pendant 24 h à 3 stations : au fond et à la surface d'une hauteur d'eau de 1 m, et au bord de l'eau. Les amphipodes épifaunaux Pontogeneia rostrata Gurjanova, 1938 et Allorchestes angusta Dana, 1856, et le fouisseur, Haustorioides koreanus Jo, 1988 ont été significativement plus abondants à la surface, la nuit que durant le jour, suggérant une migration verticale nocturne. Cependant, l'abondance du fouisseur Synchelidium lenorostralum Hirayama, 1986, n'a pas changé entre le jour et la nuit suggérant que cette espèce n'effectue pas de migrations verticales. La plupart des amphipodes, en particulier P. rostrata ont montré des réponses saisonnières différentes aux effets de la marée, apparaissant en plus forte densité pendant le reflux qu'à marée montante, durant une ou plusieurs saisons et dépendant de l'espèce. Les Amphipodes augmentent en abondance la nuit, indépendamment des variations saisonnières des marées, suggérant que l'effet journalier est plus important que l'effet de la marée. Les effets des variations saisonnières journalières et tidales sur ces amphipodes varient avec la température et leurs différents styles de vie., Although endogenous rhythms such as diel and tidal effects can influence the distribution of sandy beach amphipods, the consequences of these for the seasonal endogenous rhythms of amphipods within the subtidal surf zone of sandy beaches are little understood. We examined the seasonal variation in diel and tidal effects among benthic amphipods with different lifestyles in a sandy shore surf zone in southern Korea. Using a sledge net, quantitative samples of amphipods were taken for 24 h at three stations: at the bottom and surface at a water depth of 1 m, and at the water's edge. The epifaunal, nestling amphipods, Pontogeneia rostrata Gurjanova, 1938 and Allorchestes angusta Dana, 1856 and the burrower, Haustorioides koreanus Jo, 1988 were significantly more abundant at the surface at night than during the day, suggesting nocturnal vertical migration. However, the abundance of the burrower, Synchelidium lenorostralum Hirayama, 1986 did not change between day and night, suggesting that this species did not perform vertical migrations. Most of the amphipods, particularly P. rostrata, showed a seasonally different response to tidal effects, appearing at higher densities during ebbing than flooding tides in one or more seasons, and depending on the species. Amphipods increased in abundance at night regardless of seasonal tidal variation, suggesting that the diel effect may be more important than the tidal effect. Seasonal variation to diel and tidal effects by these amphipods varied with temperature and different lifestyles. Bien que des rythmes endogènes tels que les effets journaliers ou tidaux peuvent influencer la distribution des amphipodes des plages sableuses, leurs conséquences sur les rythmes endogènes des amphipodes de la zone infra-tidale ou des plages sableuses sont peu comprises. Nous avons examiné les variations saisonnières des effets journaliers et tidaux parmi les amphipodes benthiques avec différents styles de vie dans la zone de ressac d'une plage sableuse au sud de la Corée. A l'aide d'un filet traînant des échantillons quantitatifs d'amphipodes ont été prélevés pendant 24 h à 3 stations : au fond et à la surface d'une hauteur d'eau de 1 m, et au bord de l'eau. Les amphipodes épifaunaux Pontogeneia rostrata Gurjanova, 1938 et Allorchestes angusta Dana, 1856, et le fouisseur, Haustorioides koreanus Jo, 1988 ont été significativement plus abondants à la surface, la nuit que durant le jour, suggérant une migration verticale nocturne. Cependant, l'abondance du fouisseur Synchelidium lenorostralum Hirayama, 1986, n'a pas changé entre le jour et la nuit suggérant que cette espèce n'effectue pas de migrations verticales. La plupart des amphipodes, en particulier P. rostrata ont montré des réponses saisonnières différentes aux effets de la marée, apparaissant en plus forte densité pendant le reflux qu'à marée montante, durant une ou plusieurs saisons et dépendant de l'espèce. Les Amphipodes augmentent en abondance la nuit, indépendamment des variations saisonnières des marées, suggérant que l'effet journalier est plus important que l'effet de la marée. Les effets des variations saisonnières journalières et tidales sur ces amphipodes varient avec la température et leurs différents styles de vie.]

Affiliations: 1: Marine Living Resources Research Department, Korea Ocean Research & Development Institute, Ansan P.O. Box 29, Seoul 425-600, Korea; 2: Department of Biology, Pusan National University, Pusan 609-735, Korea; 3: Institute of Marine Science, Faculty of Earth Systems and Environmental Sciences, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757, Republic of Korea

Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/001121609x12511103974376
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/001121609x12511103974376
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/001121609x12511103974376
2009-11-01
2016-09-30

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation