Cookies Policy
X
Cookie Policy

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Stream food web responses to a large omnivorous invader, Orconectes rusticus (Decapoda, Cambaridae)

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Buy this article

Price:
$30.00+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

image of Crustaceana

[We studied the effect of an invasive omnivore, the rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus), on multiple trophic levels of lotic food webs in the upper Midwest, U.S.A. To assess food web effects we (1) conducted a crayfish exclusion experiment in an invaded stream, and (2) surveyed fish populations to compare abundance and diversity across eight streams representing an invasion gradient. In the invaded stream, electrified hoops were used to exclude rusty crayfish from typical food sources (leaves, periphyton, and benthic invertebrates). Breakdown of sugar maple leaves and abundance of invertebrates were measured over 38 days. Leaves in control hoops exposed to rusty crayfish decayed significantly faster (decay coefficient k = 0.1061) than leaves where crayfish were excluded (k = 0.0792). Fewer benthic invertebrates were found in control hoops compared to electric hoops. In contrast, periphyton standing stock on cobble was not altered by the exclusion of rusty crayfish. In the multi-stream survey, streams invaded by rusty crayfish had significantly lower fish abundance and biomass than non-invaded streams, although fish species richness did not differ between stream types. Our results suggest that invasion by rusty crayfish can have bidirectional effects on stream food webs by causing declines in food resources (e.g., detritus and invertebrates), thus indirectly affecting higher trophic levels (e.g., fish). Stream management and restoration strategies should include provisions for controlling or preventing invasions by large benthic consumers such as crayfish. Les effets d'un omnivore invasif, l'écrevisse d'Ohio (Orconectes rusticus) ont été étudiés sur les réseaux trophiques multiples de la chaîne alimentaire lotique dans le nord du Midwest, U.S.A. Pour tester les effets sur la chaîne alimentaire nous avons (1) conduit une expérience d'exclusion d'écrevisses dans un ruisseau envahi, et (2) échantillonné les populations de poissons pour comparer l'abondance et la diversité de huit ruisseaux présentant un gradient d'invasion. Dans les ruisseaux envahis des cerceaux électrifiés ont été utilisés pour exclure les écrevisses de leurs sources alimentaires typiques (feuille, périphyton, invertébrés benthiques). Les brisures de feuilles d'érable et l'abondance des invertébrés ont été mesurées sur 38 jours. Les feuilles dans les cerceaux témoins exposés aux écrevisses se sont décomposées significativement plus vite (coefficient de décomposition k = 0,1061) que les feuilles dont les écrevisses ont été exclues (k = 0,0792). Moins d'invertébrés benthiques ont été trouvés dans les cerceaux témoins par comparaison aux cerceaux électrifiés. Par contre le stock de périphyton sur les galets n'a pas été altéré par l'exclusion des écrevisses. Dans l'échantillonnage des ruisseaux, ceux envahis par l'écrevisse présentaient une abondance et une biomasse de poissons significativement plus basse que les ruisseaux non envahis, bien que la richesse spécifique en poissons ne diffère pas entre les ruisseaux. Nos résultats suggèrent que l'invasion par l'écrevisse O. rusticus peut avoir des effets bidirectionnels sur la chaine alimentaire en provoquant des déclins dans les ressources alimentaires (e.g., détritus et invertébrés), affectant ainsi indirectement les niveaux trophiques supérieurs (e.g., poissons). La gestion et la restauration des ruisseaux devrait inclure des dispositions pour contrôler ou prévenir les invasions par des grands consommateurs benthiques comme les écrevisses., We studied the effect of an invasive omnivore, the rusty crayfish (Orconectes rusticus), on multiple trophic levels of lotic food webs in the upper Midwest, U.S.A. To assess food web effects we (1) conducted a crayfish exclusion experiment in an invaded stream, and (2) surveyed fish populations to compare abundance and diversity across eight streams representing an invasion gradient. In the invaded stream, electrified hoops were used to exclude rusty crayfish from typical food sources (leaves, periphyton, and benthic invertebrates). Breakdown of sugar maple leaves and abundance of invertebrates were measured over 38 days. Leaves in control hoops exposed to rusty crayfish decayed significantly faster (decay coefficient k = 0.1061) than leaves where crayfish were excluded (k = 0.0792). Fewer benthic invertebrates were found in control hoops compared to electric hoops. In contrast, periphyton standing stock on cobble was not altered by the exclusion of rusty crayfish. In the multi-stream survey, streams invaded by rusty crayfish had significantly lower fish abundance and biomass than non-invaded streams, although fish species richness did not differ between stream types. Our results suggest that invasion by rusty crayfish can have bidirectional effects on stream food webs by causing declines in food resources (e.g., detritus and invertebrates), thus indirectly affecting higher trophic levels (e.g., fish). Stream management and restoration strategies should include provisions for controlling or preventing invasions by large benthic consumers such as crayfish. Les effets d'un omnivore invasif, l'écrevisse d'Ohio (Orconectes rusticus) ont été étudiés sur les réseaux trophiques multiples de la chaîne alimentaire lotique dans le nord du Midwest, U.S.A. Pour tester les effets sur la chaîne alimentaire nous avons (1) conduit une expérience d'exclusion d'écrevisses dans un ruisseau envahi, et (2) échantillonné les populations de poissons pour comparer l'abondance et la diversité de huit ruisseaux présentant un gradient d'invasion. Dans les ruisseaux envahis des cerceaux électrifiés ont été utilisés pour exclure les écrevisses de leurs sources alimentaires typiques (feuille, périphyton, invertébrés benthiques). Les brisures de feuilles d'érable et l'abondance des invertébrés ont été mesurées sur 38 jours. Les feuilles dans les cerceaux témoins exposés aux écrevisses se sont décomposées significativement plus vite (coefficient de décomposition k = 0,1061) que les feuilles dont les écrevisses ont été exclues (k = 0,0792). Moins d'invertébrés benthiques ont été trouvés dans les cerceaux témoins par comparaison aux cerceaux électrifiés. Par contre le stock de périphyton sur les galets n'a pas été altéré par l'exclusion des écrevisses. Dans l'échantillonnage des ruisseaux, ceux envahis par l'écrevisse présentaient une abondance et une biomasse de poissons significativement plus basse que les ruisseaux non envahis, bien que la richesse spécifique en poissons ne diffère pas entre les ruisseaux. Nos résultats suggèrent que l'invasion par l'écrevisse O. rusticus peut avoir des effets bidirectionnels sur la chaine alimentaire en provoquant des déclins dans les ressources alimentaires (e.g., détritus et invertébrés), affectant ainsi indirectement les niveaux trophiques supérieurs (e.g., poissons). La gestion et la restauration des ruisseaux devrait inclure des dispositions pour contrôler ou prévenir les invasions par des grands consommateurs benthiques comme les écrevisses.]

Affiliations: 1: Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556-0369, U.S.A.

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Create email alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Your details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Department:*
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
     
     
     
    Other:
     
    Crustaceana — Recommend this title to your library

    Thank you

    Your recommendation has been sent to your librarian.

  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation