Cookies Policy
X
Cookie Policy

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Temporal trends of two spider crabs (Brachyura, Majoidea) in nearshore kelp habitats in Alaska, U.S.A.

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Buy this article

Price:
$30.00+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

image of Crustaceana

[Pugettia gracilis and Oregonia gracilis are among the most abundant crab species in Alaskan kelp beds and were surveyed in two different kelp habitats in Kachemak Bay, Alaska, U.S.A., from June 2005 to September 2006, in order to better understand their temporal distribution. Habitats included kelp beds with understory species only and kelp beds with both understory and canopy species, which were surveyed monthly using SCUBA to quantify crab abundance and kelp density. Substrate complexity (rugosity and dominant substrate size) was assessed for each site at the beginning of the study. Pugettia gracilis abundance was highest in late summer and in habitats containing canopy kelp species, while O. gracilis had highest abundance in understory habitats in late summer. Large-scale migrations are likely not the cause of seasonal variation in abundances. Microhabitat resource utilization may account for any differences in temporal variation between P. gracilis and O. gracilis. Pugettia gracilis may rely more heavily on structural complexity from algal cover for refuge with abundances correlating with seasonal changes in kelp structure. Oregonia gracilis may rely on kelp more for decoration and less for protection provided by complex structure. Kelp associated crab species have seasonal variation in habitat use that may be correlated with kelp density. Pugettia gracilis et Oregonia gracilis sont parmi les espèces de crabes les plus abondants dans les lits (ou forêts) de varech en Alaska et ont été suivis dans deux habitats de varech différents dans la baie de Kachemak, Alaska, U.S.A., de juin 2005 à septembre 2006, de façon à mieux comprendre leur répartition au cours du temps. Les habitats incluent les forêts de varech avec des espèces de sous-canopée seulement et des forêts de varechs avec à la fois des espèces de canopée et de sous-canopée, qui ont été étudiés chaque mois en utilisant le SCUBA pour quantifier l'abondance des crabes et la densité de varech. La complexité du substrat (rugosité et taille dominante du substrat) a été évaluée pour chaque site au début de l'étude. L'abondance de Pugettia gracilis était la plus élevée à la fin de l'été et dans les habitats de canopée, tandis que O. gracilis présentait une plus grande abondance dans les habitats de sous-canopée, à la fin de l'été. Les migrations de grande échelle ne sont probablement pas la cause de la variation saisonnière des abondances. L'utilisation de la ressource comme microhabitat peut expliquer les différences de variation temporelle entre P. gracilis et O. gracilis. Pugettia gracilis peut dépendre plus fortement de la complexité structurelle de la couverture algale pour s'y réfugier, avec des abondances corrélées aux changements saisonniers de la structure du varech. Oregonia gracilis peut dépendre du varech plus pour la décoration et moins pour la protection fournie par la structure complexe. Les espèces de crabes associées au varech présentent des variations saisonnières dans l'utilisation de leur habitat qui pourraient être en corrélation avec la densité du varech., Pugettia gracilis and Oregonia gracilis are among the most abundant crab species in Alaskan kelp beds and were surveyed in two different kelp habitats in Kachemak Bay, Alaska, U.S.A., from June 2005 to September 2006, in order to better understand their temporal distribution. Habitats included kelp beds with understory species only and kelp beds with both understory and canopy species, which were surveyed monthly using SCUBA to quantify crab abundance and kelp density. Substrate complexity (rugosity and dominant substrate size) was assessed for each site at the beginning of the study. Pugettia gracilis abundance was highest in late summer and in habitats containing canopy kelp species, while O. gracilis had highest abundance in understory habitats in late summer. Large-scale migrations are likely not the cause of seasonal variation in abundances. Microhabitat resource utilization may account for any differences in temporal variation between P. gracilis and O. gracilis. Pugettia gracilis may rely more heavily on structural complexity from algal cover for refuge with abundances correlating with seasonal changes in kelp structure. Oregonia gracilis may rely on kelp more for decoration and less for protection provided by complex structure. Kelp associated crab species have seasonal variation in habitat use that may be correlated with kelp density. Pugettia gracilis et Oregonia gracilis sont parmi les espèces de crabes les plus abondants dans les lits (ou forêts) de varech en Alaska et ont été suivis dans deux habitats de varech différents dans la baie de Kachemak, Alaska, U.S.A., de juin 2005 à septembre 2006, de façon à mieux comprendre leur répartition au cours du temps. Les habitats incluent les forêts de varech avec des espèces de sous-canopée seulement et des forêts de varechs avec à la fois des espèces de canopée et de sous-canopée, qui ont été étudiés chaque mois en utilisant le SCUBA pour quantifier l'abondance des crabes et la densité de varech. La complexité du substrat (rugosité et taille dominante du substrat) a été évaluée pour chaque site au début de l'étude. L'abondance de Pugettia gracilis était la plus élevée à la fin de l'été et dans les habitats de canopée, tandis que O. gracilis présentait une plus grande abondance dans les habitats de sous-canopée, à la fin de l'été. Les migrations de grande échelle ne sont probablement pas la cause de la variation saisonnière des abondances. L'utilisation de la ressource comme microhabitat peut expliquer les différences de variation temporelle entre P. gracilis et O. gracilis. Pugettia gracilis peut dépendre plus fortement de la complexité structurelle de la couverture algale pour s'y réfugier, avec des abondances corrélées aux changements saisonniers de la structure du varech. Oregonia gracilis peut dépendre du varech plus pour la décoration et moins pour la protection fournie par la structure complexe. Les espèces de crabes associées au varech présentent des variations saisonnières dans l'utilisation de leur habitat qui pourraient être en corrélation avec la densité du varech.]

Affiliations: 1: University of Alaska Fairbanks, School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, 201 Railway Ave, Seward, Alaska 99664, U.S.A.; 2: University of Alaska Fairbanks, School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, P.O. Box 757220, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775, U.S.A.

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Create email alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Your details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Department:*
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
     
     
     
    Other:
     
    Crustaceana — Recommend this title to your library

    Thank you

    Your recommendation has been sent to your librarian.

  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation