Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Carapace relative growth of Trapezia Latreille, 1828 (Decapoda, Brachyura), crabs that are symbionts of hard corals, from Clipperton atoll and the Revillagigedo islands: ecological and zoogeographical implications

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Buy this article

Price:
$30.00+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

image of Crustaceana

[Decapod metapopulation dynamics are better understood by confronting theoretical studies with empirical data. In this study, our goal was to analyse the morphometric characteristics and relative growth of the carapace of Trapezia bidentata (Forskål, 1775) and T. digitalis Latreille, 1828, crabs from the islands Clipperton and Revillagigedo, in order to assess the degree of inter- and intraspecific similarity of the four insular populations. We examined 325 specimens and identified four species: T. bidentata (72.9% of total abundance), T. digitalis (23.1%), T. formosa Smith, 1869 (3.4%), and T. corallina Gerstaecker, 1857 (0.6%). Three carapace measurements were taken for each specimen: carapace width (CW), carapace length (CL), and interocular distance (ID). The variables CL and ID were fit to a power equation taking CW as the reference dimension. As in other brachyurans, growth pattern analyses indicated an isometric type in all CW vs CL and CW vs ID relationships examined. Interspecific differences included a larger body size for T. bidentata and larger ID/CW for T. digitalis. Significant intraspecific differences in the two insular populations of T. digitalis were evidenced in the ID/CW ratio. In contrast, populations of T. bidentata were morphometrically closer. These results indicate a higher degree of connectedness of the parts of the T. bidentata metapopulation than of that of T. digitalis, probably due to differences in the duration of their larval stages. We think that the larger body size in T. bidentata might account for competitive advantages in food gathering and habitat selection over the remaining species. In turn, as a counteracting trait for its smaller size, the larger ID might allow T. digitalis a better ability to perceive 3D and to judge relative distances between objects, thus avoiding competitive combats and improving antipredatory or escape responses. La dinámica de las metapoblaciones de decápodos se comprende mejor confrontando estudios teóricos con datos empíricos. En este estudio, nuestro objetivo fue analizar las características morfométricas y el crecimiento relativo del caparazón de Trapezia bidentata (Forskål, 1775) y T. digitalis Latreille, 1828, cangrejos de las islas Clipperton y Revillagigedo a fin de determinar el grado de similitud inter- e intraespecífica de las cuatro poblaciones insulares. Se examinaron 325 especímenes e identificaron cuatro especies: T. bidentata (72.9% de la abundancia total), T. digitalis (23.1%), T. formosa Smith, 1869 (3.4%) y T. corallina Gerstaecker, 1857 (0.6%). Para cada espécimen, se tomaron tres dimensiones del caparazón: ancho (CW), largo (CL) y distancia interocular (ID). Las variables CL e ID se ajustaron a una ecuación de tipo potencial tomando CW como la dimensión de referencia. Como en otros braquiuros, los análisis del patrón de crecimiento mostraron un tipo isométrico en todas las relaciones CW vs CL y CW vs ID examinadas. Las diferencias interespecíficas incluyeron un mayor tamaño corporal para T. bidentata y un mayor valor en el cociente ID/CW para T. digitalis. Se evidenciaron diferencias significativas intraespecíficas entre las dos poblaciones insulares de T. digitalis en el cociente ID/CW. En contraste, las poblaciones de T. bidentata fueron morfométricamente más semejantes. Estos resultados indican un mayor grado de conectividad en la metapoblación de T. bidentata que en aquella de T. digitalis, debido probablemente a diferencias en la duración de sus estados larvarios. Se piensa que la mayor talla corporal de T. bidentata representaría una mayor ventaja competitiva sobre el resto de las especies para atrapar alimento y seleccionar su hábitat. A su vez, para contrarrestar su pequeño tamaño, mayor ID permitiría a T. digitalis una mejor habilidad para percibir la 3D y juzgar la distancia relativa entre los objetos, evitando así combates competitivos y mejorando sus respuestas de escape y antidepredatorias., Decapod metapopulation dynamics are better understood by confronting theoretical studies with empirical data. In this study, our goal was to analyse the morphometric characteristics and relative growth of the carapace of Trapezia bidentata (Forskål, 1775) and T. digitalis Latreille, 1828, crabs from the islands Clipperton and Revillagigedo, in order to assess the degree of inter- and intraspecific similarity of the four insular populations. We examined 325 specimens and identified four species: T. bidentata (72.9% of total abundance), T. digitalis (23.1%), T. formosa Smith, 1869 (3.4%), and T. corallina Gerstaecker, 1857 (0.6%). Three carapace measurements were taken for each specimen: carapace width (CW), carapace length (CL), and interocular distance (ID). The variables CL and ID were fit to a power equation taking CW as the reference dimension. As in other brachyurans, growth pattern analyses indicated an isometric type in all CW vs CL and CW vs ID relationships examined. Interspecific differences included a larger body size for T. bidentata and larger ID/CW for T. digitalis. Significant intraspecific differences in the two insular populations of T. digitalis were evidenced in the ID/CW ratio. In contrast, populations of T. bidentata were morphometrically closer. These results indicate a higher degree of connectedness of the parts of the T. bidentata metapopulation than of that of T. digitalis, probably due to differences in the duration of their larval stages. We think that the larger body size in T. bidentata might account for competitive advantages in food gathering and habitat selection over the remaining species. In turn, as a counteracting trait for its smaller size, the larger ID might allow T. digitalis a better ability to perceive 3D and to judge relative distances between objects, thus avoiding competitive combats and improving antipredatory or escape responses. La dinámica de las metapoblaciones de decápodos se comprende mejor confrontando estudios teóricos con datos empíricos. En este estudio, nuestro objetivo fue analizar las características morfométricas y el crecimiento relativo del caparazón de Trapezia bidentata (Forskål, 1775) y T. digitalis Latreille, 1828, cangrejos de las islas Clipperton y Revillagigedo a fin de determinar el grado de similitud inter- e intraespecífica de las cuatro poblaciones insulares. Se examinaron 325 especímenes e identificaron cuatro especies: T. bidentata (72.9% de la abundancia total), T. digitalis (23.1%), T. formosa Smith, 1869 (3.4%) y T. corallina Gerstaecker, 1857 (0.6%). Para cada espécimen, se tomaron tres dimensiones del caparazón: ancho (CW), largo (CL) y distancia interocular (ID). Las variables CL e ID se ajustaron a una ecuación de tipo potencial tomando CW como la dimensión de referencia. Como en otros braquiuros, los análisis del patrón de crecimiento mostraron un tipo isométrico en todas las relaciones CW vs CL y CW vs ID examinadas. Las diferencias interespecíficas incluyeron un mayor tamaño corporal para T. bidentata y un mayor valor en el cociente ID/CW para T. digitalis. Se evidenciaron diferencias significativas intraespecíficas entre las dos poblaciones insulares de T. digitalis en el cociente ID/CW. En contraste, las poblaciones de T. bidentata fueron morfométricamente más semejantes. Estos resultados indican un mayor grado de conectividad en la metapoblación de T. bidentata que en aquella de T. digitalis, debido probablemente a diferencias en la duración de sus estados larvarios. Se piensa que la mayor talla corporal de T. bidentata representaría una mayor ventaja competitiva sobre el resto de las especies para atrapar alimento y seleccionar su hábitat. A su vez, para contrarrestar su pequeño tamaño, mayor ID permitiría a T. digitalis una mejor habilidad para percibir la 3D y juzgar la distancia relativa entre los objetos, evitando así combates competitivos y mejorando sus respuestas de escape y antidepredatorias.]

Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/001121610x533520
2010-11-01
2015-06-03

Affiliations: 1: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Apdo. Postal 70-305, 04510 Mexico, D.F., Mexico; 2: Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza, Batalla 5 de mayo esquina Fuerte de Loreto, 09230 Mexico, D.F., Mexico

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to email alerts
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Your details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Department:*
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
     
     
     
    Other:
     
    Crustaceana — Recommend this title to your library

    Thank you

    Your recommendation has been sent to your librarian.

  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation