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Full Access Low levels of genetic diversity among morphologically distinct populations of an enigmatic montane frog from Mexico (Craugastor uno: Craugastoridae)

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Low levels of genetic diversity among morphologically distinct populations of an enigmatic montane frog from Mexico (Craugastor uno: Craugastoridae)

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Craugastor uno is a direct-developing frog endemic to high-elevation pine-oak forests of the Sierra Madre del Sur in Mexico. The species was described from a single female specimen collected in the state of Guerrero, but otherwise remains poorly known. It is listed as endangered by the IUCN and some authors have considered it extinct. A recent report expanding the range to include montane localities in the state of Oaxaca has been disputed. Herein we describe variation in a group of 7 C. uno specimens that includes males, females, and juveniles collected from 1972 to 2004. We compared individuals from localities in the states of Guerrero and Oaxaca using morphology and several genetic markers. Molecular analyses revealed C. uno exhibits little genetic variation at the loci sampled. Our findings suggest that while the Guerrero and Oaxaca populations have diverged only recently from one another, they appear to be presently isolated and may be distinguished by several distinct quantitative and qualitative morphological traits. We also report multilocus genetic evidence of this putative isolation in the form of regional segregation among haplotypes. However, at this time we refrain from revising the taxonomy owing to our small sample size and limited geographic coverage.

Affiliations: 1: Amphibian and Reptile Diversity Research Center, Department of Biology, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, Texas 76019, USA

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/content/journals/10.1163/017353710x542976
2011-01-01
2016-12-09

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