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Lament or Complaint? A Response to Scott Ellington, Risking Truth: Reshaping the World through Prayers of Lament

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This review finds Scott A. Ellington's Risking Truth: Reshaping the World through Prayers of Lament to be an important and helpful study of the biblical prayers of lament. Ellington argues that lament is a faithful and healthy response to God and that lament is fundamental to maintaining and deepening one's relationship to God. Harrington, however, poses two questions in response: 1) What is the difference between lament and complaint? Biblical examples seem to indicate that God is not pleased with all forms of complaint; and 2) Exactly what does the believer risk by offering a lament? Harrington argues that during times of suffering it is praise, not protest, that connects the faithful with their God.

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/content/journals/10.1163/096673609x12469601161872
2009-09-01
2015-04-27

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