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{null=Cover crops and Pochonia chlamydosporia for the control of Meloidogyne javanica, en=Cover crops and <i>Pochonia chlamydosporia</i> for the control of <i>Meloidogyne javanica</i>}

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{null=The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of the combination of Pochonia chlamydosporia var. chlamydosporia with summer and winter cover plants on the control of Meloidogyne javanica on tomato plants under glasshouse conditions. Treatment combinations were with four soil covers (pearl millet and Surinam grass in Experiment 1, oil radish and black oat in Experiment 2; plus tomato and fallow controls) and two P. chlamydosporia treatments (with or without the fungus). The antagonist was applied to nematode-infested soil when the cover crops or tomato were planted. Tomato plants were removed and the above-ground parts of the cover crops were cut, dried, and placed on the pots 60 days after planting. One tomato seedling was transplanted in each pot in a no-tillage system and cultivated for 60 days. Surinam grass, pearl millet and black oat reduced galls and eggs of M. javanica by more than 90%, without application of the fungus. However, P. chlamydosporia + Surinam grass significantly reduced by 72% the number of galls compared with cultivation of the grass in soil without the fungus. Pochonia chlamydosporia became established in soil and could be re-isolated at the end of both experiments. Colony forming units (CFU) (g soil)–1 varied from 1.0 × 105 (fallow) to 2.6 × 105 (pearl millet) and from 1.1 × 105 (fallow) to 2.3 × 105 (oil radish) for the experiments with summer soil cover crops and winter soil cover crops, respectively. The cultivation of Surinam grass, pearl millet and black oat reduced M. javanica populations, and the combination with P. chlamydosporia may favour the establishment of the fungus in the soil and enhance the control of the nematode., en=<p>The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of the combination of <i>Pochonia chlamydosporia</i> var. <i>chlamydosporia</i> with summer and winter cover plants on the control of <i>Meloidogyne javanica</i> on tomato plants under glasshouse conditions. Treatment combinations were with four soil covers (pearl millet and Surinam grass in Experiment 1, oil radish and black oat in Experiment 2; plus tomato and fallow controls) and two <i>P. chlamydosporia</i> treatments (with or without the fungus). The antagonist was applied to nematode-infested soil when the cover crops or tomato were planted. Tomato plants were removed and the above-ground parts of the cover crops were cut, dried, and placed on the pots 60 days after planting. One tomato seedling was transplanted in each pot in a no-tillage system and cultivated for 60 days. Surinam grass, pearl millet and black oat reduced galls and eggs of <i>M. javanica</i> by more than 90%, without application of the fungus. However, <i>P. chlamydosporia</i>+Surinam grass significantly reduced by 72% the number of galls compared with cultivation of the grass in soil without the fungus. <i>Pochonia chlamydosporia</i> became established in soil and could be re-isolated at the end of both experiments. Colony forming units (CFU) (g soil)<sup>&#x2212;1</sup> varied from 1.0&#xD7;10<sup>5</sup> (fallow) to 2.6&#xD7;10<sup>5</sup> (pearl millet) and from 1.1&#xD7;10<sup>5</sup> (fallow) to 2.3&#xD7;10<sup>5</sup> (oil radish) for the experiments with summer soil cover crops and winter soil cover crops, respectively. The cultivation of Surinam grass, pearl millet and black oat reduced <i>M. javanica</i> populations, and the combination with <i>P. chlamydosporia</i> may favour the establishment of the fungus in the soil and enhance the control of the nematode.</p>}

Affiliations: 1: Universidade Estadual do Centro-Oeste, Campus CEDETEG, Guarapuava, PR 85040-080, Brazil; 2: Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Viçosa, MG 36570-000, Brazil; 3: Universidade Federal de Viçosa – Campus Rio Paranaíba, Rio Paranaíba, MG 38810-000, Brazil;, Email: everaldolopes@ufv.br

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/content/journals/10.1163/138855411x563875
2011-04-13
2017-07-21

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