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{null=Grassland management history affects the response of the nematode community to changes in above-ground grazing regime, en=Grassland management history affects the response of the nematode community to changes in above-ground grazing regime}

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{null=Changes in grassland management induce disturbances that influence both soil functioning and soil fauna. This study aimed at determining the extent to which the composition of a grassland soil nematode community could be altered by a shift of grazing regime and the potential feedback that these alterations could provoke on grassland functioning. Therefore, we monitored the composition of the soil nematode community (i.e., plant-, bacterial- and fungal-feeders, omnivores and carnivores) of mesocosms that were sampled from two contrasted long-term field trials (high vs low grazing treatments) and subsequently subjected to high or no grazing for 2 years. The soil nematofauna responded faster and more strongly to the application of an intensive grazing regime on a previously extensively exploited system than the other way round. The application of an intensive grazing regime induced a significant increase in numbers of bacterial feeders and a decrease of the relative abundance of fungal-feeding nematodes. The nematofaunal community structure was determined by both the past and current grazing regimes throughout the 2 years of monitoring. Observed effects on soil microbivores seemed to reflect the 'immediate' above-ground primary production potential and to follow micro-organism dynamics. On the other hand, observed effects on root-feeding nematodes seemed to reflect the integral effect of past and current grazing regimes on plant community root biomass and quality., en=<p>Changes in grassland management induce disturbances that influence both soil functioning and soil fauna. This study aimed at determining the extent to which the composition of a grassland soil nematode community could be altered by a shift of grazing regime and the potential feedback that these alterations could provoke on grassland functioning. Therefore, we monitored the composition of the soil nematode community (<i>i.e.</i>, plant-, bacterial- and fungal-feeders, omnivores and carnivores) of mesocosms that were sampled from two contrasted long-term field trials (high <i>vs</i> low grazing treatments) and subsequently subjected to high or no grazing for 2 years. The soil nematofauna responded faster and more strongly to the application of an intensive grazing regime on a previously extensively exploited system than the other way round. The application of an intensive grazing regime induced a significant increase in numbers of bacterial feeders and a decrease of the relative abundance of fungal-feeding nematodes. The nematofaunal community structure was determined by both the past and current grazing regimes throughout the 2 years of monitoring. Observed effects on soil microbivores seemed to reflect the &#x2018;immediate&#x2019; above-ground primary production potential and to follow micro-organism dynamics. On the other hand, observed effects on root-feeding nematodes seemed to reflect the integral effect of past and current grazing regimes on plant community root biomass and quality.</p>}

Affiliations: 1: IRD-UMR 210 Eco&Sols – SupAgro, 2 place Viala, Bâtiment 12, 1 erétage, 34060 Montpellier Cedex 1, France;, Email: cecile.villenave@ird.fr; 2: Groupe ISA-Lille, BioGAP, 48 boulevard Vauban, F-59046 Lille cedex, France; 3: Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS UMR 5557, INRA USC 1196, Ecologie Microbienne, Villeurbanne F-69622, France; 4: Unité d'Agronomie (INRA), Site de Crouel, 234 Avenue du Brézet, F-63100 Clermont Ferrand, France; 5: Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS UMR 5557, INRA USC 1196, Ecologie Microbienne, Villeurbanne F-69622, France, Fondation pour la recherche sur la biodiversité FRB, 57 rue Cuvier, 75005 Paris, France

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/content/journals/10.1163/138855411x574558
2011-06-03
2016-12-11

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