Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Maskil, Community, and Religious Experience in the Songs of the Sage (4Q510–511) 1

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Maskil, Community, and Religious Experience in the Songs of the Sage (4Q510–511) 1

  • HTML
  • PDF
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Dead Sea Discoveries

Abstract The present study seeks to illuminate how the recitation of the prophylactic magical hymns known as 4QSongs of the Sage engendered religious experience for worshipers. Previous research on this composition has focused on locating it within the broader streams of early Jewish magical and apocalyptic tradition, but little attention has been paid to the apotropaic function of the Songs within the larger religious experiential framework implied by the text. This study argues that despite the lack of concrete information pertaining to ritual praxis, the language of the Songs reveals that participation in the ritual was designed to bring worshipers to understand themselves as realizing essential Qumranite ideals such as perfect purity and supernal knowledge, and to experience communion with the angels in the image of “the eternal sanctuary.” It is suggested that the protection from the demons offered by the Songs is not so much the result of “magic” as it is a natural outcome of the perceived attainment of these ideals.

Affiliations: 1: Yeshiva University New York jangel@yu.edu

10.1163/156851712X624480
/content/journals/10.1163/156851712x624480
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading

Abstract The present study seeks to illuminate how the recitation of the prophylactic magical hymns known as 4QSongs of the Sage engendered religious experience for worshipers. Previous research on this composition has focused on locating it within the broader streams of early Jewish magical and apocalyptic tradition, but little attention has been paid to the apotropaic function of the Songs within the larger religious experiential framework implied by the text. This study argues that despite the lack of concrete information pertaining to ritual praxis, the language of the Songs reveals that participation in the ritual was designed to bring worshipers to understand themselves as realizing essential Qumranite ideals such as perfect purity and supernal knowledge, and to experience communion with the angels in the image of “the eternal sanctuary.” It is suggested that the protection from the demons offered by the Songs is not so much the result of “magic” as it is a natural outcome of the perceived attainment of these ideals.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/15685179/19/1/15685179_019_01_S01_text.html;jsessionid=jrlhdKgdAyRxHC8WOXkc8ekv.x-brill-live-03?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/156851712x624480&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/156851712x624480
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156851712x624480
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156851712x624480
2012-01-01
2016-12-08

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation