Cookies Policy
X
Cookie Policy

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

ARMOR IN CHINA BEFORE THE TANG DYNASTY

MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Buy this article

Price:
$30.00+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

image of Journal of East Asian Archaeology

The earliest traces of armor in China consist of bronze helmets, since body armor was made of non-durable leather. The earliest surviving body armor is of lacquered leather laminae from the Warring States period (fifth-third centuries BC). Over time, the size of the laminae grew smaller. Metal body armor appears in the Han Dynasty but lacquered leather probably remained in use for some time after that. Heavier armor and barded horses appear after the invention of the stirrup in the fourth century. Scale armor is associated with non-Chinese, and neither plate armor nor chain-mail was utilized in China. During the Tang Dynasty, a type of long rectangular lamellar armor appears to have been introduced from Iran, ending a long autochthonous tradition.

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Create email alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Your details
    Name:*
    Email:*
    Department:*
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
     
     
     
    Other:
     
    Journal of East Asian Archaeology — Recommend this title to your library

    Thank you

    Your recommendation has been sent to your librarian.

  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation