Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Poetry, Rhetoric, and Science: The Case of Plaustra Bootes

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Poetry, Rhetoric, and Science: The Case of Plaustra Bootes

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

[Abstract This article examines the aural qualities of the collocation plaustra Bootes, its application in Latin poetry, and the precepts of rhetorical theory which explain its use. Plaustra Bootes, which occurs frequently, refers to either or both of the circumpolar constellations Ursa Major and Ursa Minor, configured as ‘wagons’, and to Bootes, the ‘Oxman’ who tends them. The case is made that the collocation is a poetic formula characterized by solemnity of diction, and that its application is limited to contexts, usually characterized by highly elaborate rhetoric, which train the attention on matters of natural science and philosophy. The rhetorical theory of the sublime provides the means to explain the pairing of diction and subject matter. It establishes a hierarchy of sublime topics which include philosophy and natural science, and it indicates the appropriate manner to express elevated thought. In this way rhetorical theory raises the question of the place of science in rhetoric and poetry. Implicit in the theory of the sublime is a system of thought in which rhetoric, poetic theory, and science are aligned with each other as representations in different domains of the same reality., Abstract This article examines the aural qualities of the collocation plaustra Bootes, its application in Latin poetry, and the precepts of rhetorical theory which explain its use. Plaustra Bootes, which occurs frequently, refers to either or both of the circumpolar constellations Ursa Major and Ursa Minor, configured as ‘wagons’, and to Bootes, the ‘Oxman’ who tends them. The case is made that the collocation is a poetic formula characterized by solemnity of diction, and that its application is limited to contexts, usually characterized by highly elaborate rhetoric, which train the attention on matters of natural science and philosophy. The rhetorical theory of the sublime provides the means to explain the pairing of diction and subject matter. It establishes a hierarchy of sublime topics which include philosophy and natural science, and it indicates the appropriate manner to express elevated thought. In this way rhetorical theory raises the question of the place of science in rhetoric and poetry. Implicit in the theory of the sublime is a system of thought in which rhetoric, poetic theory, and science are aligned with each other as representations in different domains of the same reality.]

Affiliations: 1: University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Department of Foreign Languages and Literature P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201-0413 USA rmonti@uwm.edu

[Abstract This article examines the aural qualities of the collocation plaustra Bootes, its application in Latin poetry, and the precepts of rhetorical theory which explain its use. Plaustra Bootes, which occurs frequently, refers to either or both of the circumpolar constellations Ursa Major and Ursa Minor, configured as ‘wagons’, and to Bootes, the ‘Oxman’ who tends them. The case is made that the collocation is a poetic formula characterized by solemnity of diction, and that its application is limited to contexts, usually characterized by highly elaborate rhetoric, which train the attention on matters of natural science and philosophy. The rhetorical theory of the sublime provides the means to explain the pairing of diction and subject matter. It establishes a hierarchy of sublime topics which include philosophy and natural science, and it indicates the appropriate manner to express elevated thought. In this way rhetorical theory raises the question of the place of science in rhetoric and poetry. Implicit in the theory of the sublime is a system of thought in which rhetoric, poetic theory, and science are aligned with each other as representations in different domains of the same reality., Abstract This article examines the aural qualities of the collocation plaustra Bootes, its application in Latin poetry, and the precepts of rhetorical theory which explain its use. Plaustra Bootes, which occurs frequently, refers to either or both of the circumpolar constellations Ursa Major and Ursa Minor, configured as ‘wagons’, and to Bootes, the ‘Oxman’ who tends them. The case is made that the collocation is a poetic formula characterized by solemnity of diction, and that its application is limited to contexts, usually characterized by highly elaborate rhetoric, which train the attention on matters of natural science and philosophy. The rhetorical theory of the sublime provides the means to explain the pairing of diction and subject matter. It establishes a hierarchy of sublime topics which include philosophy and natural science, and it indicates the appropriate manner to express elevated thought. In this way rhetorical theory raises the question of the place of science in rhetoric and poetry. Implicit in the theory of the sublime is a system of thought in which rhetoric, poetic theory, and science are aligned with each other as representations in different domains of the same reality.]

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/1568525x/65/1/1568525X_065_01_S06_text.html;jsessionid=lJ3sxxdmRxTEhIJEKfFTHUNi.x-brill-live-03?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/156852511x547794&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/156852511x547794
Loading

Data & Media loading...

1. Amisen-Marchetti M. Sapientiae facies. Étude sur les images de Sénèque 1989 Paris
2. Braund S. Juvenal. Satires. Book I 1996 Cambridge
3. Costa C.D.N. Seneca. Medea 1973 Oxford
4. Courtney E. A Commentary on the Satires of Juvenal 1980 London
5. Dahlmann H. Cornelius Severus 1975 Wiesbaden
6. Dahlmann H. "Das Fragment des Cn. Cornelius Gaetulicus (FPL Mor. S. 123)" Studi di poesia in onore di Antonio Traglia 1979 Rome 657 667 [no author]
7. Gruber J. Kommentar zu Boethius De Consolatione Philosophiae 2006 Berlin/New York http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/9783110902280
8. Håkanson L. Silius Italicus: kritische und exegetische Bemerkungen 1976 Lund
9. Hine H.M. An Edition with Commentary of Seneca, Natural Questions, Book Two 1981 New York
10. Hine H.M. Seneca. Medea 2000 Warminster
11. Housman A.E. "Fragmenta poetarum" CR 1935 Vol 49 166 168
12. Hutchinson G.O. Hellenistic Poetry 1988 Oxford
13. Innes D.C. "Gigantomachy and Natural Philosphy" CQ 1979 Vol 29 165 171 http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S000983880003528X
14. Kendell S.A.H. Magnus Felix Ennodius. A Gentleman of the Church 2000 Ann Arbor
15. Kißel W. Aules Persius Flaccus. Satiren 1990 Heidelberg
16. Lausberg H. Handbook of Literary Rhetoric 1998 Leiden
17. Mynors R.A.B. Virgil. Georgics 1990 Oxford
18. Nisbet R.G.M. M. Tulli Ciceronis in L. Calpurnium Pisonem oratio 1961 Oxford
19. Nisbet R.G.M. Hubbard M. A Commentary on Horace: Odes, Book 1 1970 Oxford
20. Race W.H. The Classical Priamel from Homer to Boethius 1982 Leiden
21. Reichenberger K. Untersuchungen zur literarischen Stellung der Consolatio Philosophiae 1954 Köln
22. Rothstein M. Sextus Propertius. Elegien 1966 Dublin/Zurich
23. Schotes H.-A. Stoische Physik, Psychologie und Theologie bei Lucan 1969 Bonn
24. Shackleton Bailey D.R. "Echoes of Propertius" Mnemosyne 1952 Vol 5 307 333 http://dx.doi.org/10.1163/156852552X00371
25. Soubiran J. "L’astronomie à Rome" Actes du Colloque tenu à l’Université de Toulouse-Le Mirail 21-23 octobre 1977 1979 Paris 167 183 [no author]
26. Spaltenstein F. Commentaire des Punica de Silius Italicus 1986 Genève
27. Spaltenstein F. Commentaire des Argonautica de Valerius Flaccus (livres 1 et 2) 2002 Brussels
28. Tarrant R.J. Seneca. Agamemnon 1976 Cambridge
29. Traglia A. M. Tulli Ciceronis poetica fragmenta 1967 Milan
30. Vandone G. Appunti su una poetica tardoantica: Ennodio, carm. 1, 7-8 = 26-27V 2004 Pisa
31. Vogel F. Magni Felicis Ennodi opera 1885 Berlin
32. Wooten C.W. Hermogenes on Types of Style 1987 Chapel Hill
http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156852511x547794
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156852511x547794
2012-01-01
2016-12-05

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation