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Alas, Poor Io! Bilingual Wordplay in Horace Epode 11

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Alas, Poor Io! Bilingual Wordplay in Horace Epode 11, Page 1 of 1

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1. Barchiesi A. Corte F. , Carlos J. " Alcune difficoltà nella carriera di un poeta giambico. Giambo ed elegia nell’epodo XI " Bimilenario de Horacio 1994 Salamanca 127 138
2. Barchiesi A. Ovidio: Metamorfosi 2005 Vol 1 Milano
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45. Watson L.C. A Commentary on Horace’s Epodes 2003 Oxford
46. FN1 1)“L’Argiva, la Greca”: Cavarzere 1992, 190; Italian prostitutes: Watson 2003, 367.
47. FN2 2)Mankin 1995, 196; Watson 2003, 367.
48. FN3 3)Hdn. De prosodia catholica GG3.1.288.34, St.Byz. s.v. Ἰναχία (identical entries).
49. FN4 4)[A.] Pr. 589-90, Call. Epigr. 57.1, Mosch. 51, Verg. G.3.153, Ov. Fast. 3.658, V.Fl. 4.357, Sil. 10.347, Ter. Maur. de metris2528, Nonn. D.1.393, 3.285, 3.369, 8.365, 32.69, AP5.262, 7.169.1.
50. FN5 5)“Horace is a tauruswith Inachia . . ., but a broken reed with the vetula.” Watson 2003, 408; cf. Mankin 1995, 210.
51. FN6 6)Kiessling and Heinze 1930, 511; Mankin 1995, 197.
52. FN7 7)On the elegiac quality of Epod.11, famously, Leo 1900, 9-10. Cf. Grassmann 1966, 34-46; Watson 1983, esp. 232-4. On its being signalled by the metrical connotations of incerto pedein line 20, see Heyworth 1993, 87-8; Barchiesi 1994, Harrison 2001, 180-2, Lyne 2005, 11-2. For a reassertion of the epode’s relationship to archaic lyric and iambos: Vox 1997, 61-6.
53. FN8 8)On the use of vertical juxtaposition in consecutive lines to highlight wordplays and etymologies, see O’Hara 1996, 86-8. On the applicability of vertical juxtaposition in this case, see below.
54. FN9 9)Johansen and Whittle 1980, 132; “a sort of quasi-etymological word-play”, Sandin 2003, 118.
55. FN10 10) TLL7.2.281.20-282.6. First extant at Pl. Cas. 799-800.
56. FN11 11)Reeson 2003, 295; Hardie (2002, 253) also credits A. Barchiesi for suggesting this to him per litteras.
57. FN12 12)Calv. fr. 20 FRP= 9 FPL/ FLP. Cf. Verg. E.6.47, 52, Ov. Met.1.632-4. I am grateful to Mnemosyne’s anonymous referee for suggesting the wordplay in Calvus and thus encouraging me to include a point which I had already thought of independently but had been diffident about printing. On the use of ain Roman poetry more generally (though with no suggestion of this wordplay), see Kershaw 1980, Marchetta 1994.
58. FN13 13)Hardie 2002, 253. Barchiesi (2005, 221) stresses rather the reflection on the nature of writing but also notes “una sorta di gioco di parole translinguistico”. Sadly, Planudes’ translation of the Metamorphosesinto Greek misses the opportunity to make the word-play explicit by rendering me miserumwith ἰώ; instead, he translates it οἴµοι, τάλας! Bömer (1969, 199) suggests that the scene is influenced by the recording of Apollo’s lament for Hyacinthus as AI AI on the petals of the eponymous flower, attested before Ovid at Euphorion fr. 40 Powell.
59. FN14 14)For his puns on names in general: Paschalis 1995, Reckford 1997, esp. 593-610; on their limitations: Parker 2000a. On bilingual puns in particular: Cairns 1995a, 91-6, id. 1995b, Paschalis 1995, 182-90, Moles 2002, 99.
60. FN15 15)Apparently first noted by MacLeod (1979, 220-1).
61. FN16 16)Paschalis 1995, 186.
62. FN17 17)See n. 8 above.
63. FN18 18)I am grateful to Mnemosyne’s anonymous reviewer for this point.
64. FN19 19)E.g. Barchiesi 2007, 152: “He avoids self-consciousness of the text as a detachable written object”. The exception might be Horace’s desire that ‘he’, as equated with the book of Odes, might be ‘inserted’ in the canon of Greek lyric poets at Carm.1.1.35, with Farrell 2007, 189-90.
65. FN20 20) oculisque legi manibusque teneri( Ep. 1.19.34); ingratus. . . lector(35). On the tension between writing/reading and performance in Horatian lyric and iambos, see also Lowrie 1997, 55-76, and 2009, 63-141, including a brief discussion of Epod.11 in this context at 105-6.
66. FN21 21)Mankin 1995, 202; Parker 2000b.
67. FN22 22)Montiglio 2005, 17-23.
68. FN23 23)Campbell (1994, 246-7) gives further parallels for οἶστρος as the “frenzy-inducing ‘sting’ of Eros/eros”, but does not mention Io. Hunter (1989, 128) sees this as “giving concrete form to the metaphorical ‘frenzy’ of love found in earlier literature” and compares Io.
69. FN24 24)V.Fl. 7.111-2, with discussion by Hershkowitz (1998, 29-33).
70. FN25 25)Thomas 1982.
71. FN26 26)Ross 1987, 157-67. Cf. Gale 2000, 125: “Virgil alludes to the stor[y] . . . of Io and the gadfly in a context which implicitly connects [it] with the dehumanizing power of amor”.
72. FN27 27)I am grateful to Mnemosyne’s anonymous reviewer for this point.
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2012-01-01
2016-02-11

Affiliations: 1: Dept. of Classics and Ancient History SOPHI, Quadrangle Building A14, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 Australia bob.cowan@sydney.edu.au

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