Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

The Significance of Others: A Prehistory of Rhythm and Interspecies Participation

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Society & Animals

Abstract The understanding of relations that bound humans and animals together during prehistory is undergoing a radical transformation in archaeology from broadly economic to social models. A reconsideration of the role of material culture in the production of social worlds is integral to these new approaches. The following article argues, however, that it is unhelpful to begin with separate human and animal domains that are mediated by symbols and material signifiers. Instead a plea is outlined for an integrated approach to species cohabitation and coevolution that focuses upon situated assemblies of material bodies and the intra-action of all participants within these spaces. It is suggested that scales of rhythm serve to regulate these intra-actions. Using examples from the Danish Mesolithic and the British Bronze Age, particularly of swan hunting and horse riding, this article shows how archaeology may be ideally equipped to articulate these phenomena, and for defining the varied and dynamic means by which species get along as significant “Others” in local contexts of cohabitation.

Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/15685306-12341298
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/15685306-12341298
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/15685306-12341298
2013-01-01
2016-12-02

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Society & Animals — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation