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Gerald Odonis on the Plurality of Worlds

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Pierre Duhem and Eugenio Randi have investigated the later-medieval history of the problem of whether the existence of more than one world is possible, determining that Aristotle's denial of that possibility was rejected on theological grounds in the second half of the thirteenth century, but it was Nicole Oresme in the mid-fourteenth century who gave the strongest philosophical arguments against the Peripatetic stance, opting instead for Plato's position. For different reasons, neither Duhem nor Randi was able to examine Gerald Odonis' question on the subject. In this text, edited here, Odonis also opposes Aristotle for philosophical reasons and sides explicitly with Plato. Was Oresme aware of Odonis' opinion?

Affiliations: 1: University of Cyprus

10.1163/156853409X428159
/content/journals/10.1163/156853409x428159
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/content/journals/10.1163/156853409x428159
2009-05-01
2016-08-30

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