Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Full Access Rapids on the “Stream of Life”: The Significance of Water Movement on the Kemi River

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Rapids on the “Stream of Life”: The Significance of Water Movement on the Kemi River

  • PDF
  • HTML
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology

This article explores the significance of rapids for the inhabitants of the banks of the Kemi River in Finnish Lapland. The river is frequently called “stream of life,” and people emphasize the critical role rapids play for this label. Starting from narratives, practices and material culture relating to the water movements along rapids, the article suggests two hypotheses: first, human associations of water with life arise not only from its characteristics as a substance in itself, but also from its particular movements through the environment. Second, the idea that “water means life” resonates with the similarity of shapes created by water movements and forms permeating all living processes. Building on the work of Strang (e.g. 2005a), Ingold (e.g. 2006) and Schwenk (1965) conclude that calling the Kemi a “stream of life” relates to people’s active engagement in its particular movements.

Affiliations: 1: Department of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Estonian Institute of Humanities, Tallinn University, Uus-Sadama 5, 10120 Tallinn, Estonia, franz.krause@tlu.ee

10.1163/15685357-01702008
/content/journals/10.1163/15685357-01702008
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading

This article explores the significance of rapids for the inhabitants of the banks of the Kemi River in Finnish Lapland. The river is frequently called “stream of life,” and people emphasize the critical role rapids play for this label. Starting from narratives, practices and material culture relating to the water movements along rapids, the article suggests two hypotheses: first, human associations of water with life arise not only from its characteristics as a substance in itself, but also from its particular movements through the environment. Second, the idea that “water means life” resonates with the similarity of shapes created by water movements and forms permeating all living processes. Building on the work of Strang (e.g. 2005a), Ingold (e.g. 2006) and Schwenk (1965) conclude that calling the Kemi a “stream of life” relates to people’s active engagement in its particular movements.

Loading

Full text loading...

/deliver/15685357/17/2/15685357_017_02_S08_text.html;jsessionid=qaeAoamRVZVPT0BhyY9kOTmY.x-brill-live-02?itemId=/content/journals/10.1163/15685357-01702008&mimeType=html&fmt=ahah
/content/journals/10.1163/15685357-01702008
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/15685357-01702008
Loading
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/15685357-01702008
2013-01-01
2016-12-09

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Subscribe to Citation alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation