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Bioregionalism- a Misplaced Project?

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image of Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology

In response to what postmodern thinkers have called 'homelessness' and to the increasing destruction of the natural environment, some thinkers have suggested that humans should organise themselves into bioregional communities. These communities will be self-governing, relatively autonomous, small groups based on watersheds, river drainages, lakeshores, or other bioregional features. Their core values will be identification with, and care for, the land. I explore a form of this viewpoint, called 'homely bioregionalism'. I argue that this position has little real connection with postmodern thoughts on place and home, it has totalitarian overtones and, even when interpreted as an empirical recommendation, incorporates an optimistic and romanticised conception of 'home'. The phenomenon of ignoring or denying our environmental surroundings is, I argue, a real one, and can be called 'bioregional denial'. Homely bioregionalism, however, does not constitute a workable alternative to bioregional denial.

Affiliations: 1: Department of Philosophy The University of Western Australia Perth, WA 6907, Australia

10.1163/156853598X00226
/content/journals/10.1163/156853598x00226
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/content/journals/10.1163/156853598x00226
1998-01-01
2016-09-27

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