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Open Access Die johanneischen Zeichen und Joh 2:11 als möglicher hermeneutischer Schlüssel

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Die johanneischen Zeichen und Joh 2:11 als möglicher hermeneutischer Schlüssel

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image of Novum Testamentum

AbstractThe Greek term ἀρχή occurs in John 2:11, at the end of the story of the wedding at Cana. Water was changed into wine at this occasion and this is called the “beginning of the signs”. This Greek term—often translated in this context not as “beginning of the signs” but rather as “first sign”—can denote the beginning of a dynamically structured sequence. Elements in the narratives of the various signs seem to build a dynamic structure, thereby assigning each sign a fixed position in a climactic story which ends with the raising of Lazarus. This has consequences for literary criticism of the Gospel of John. It is widely held that chapters 5 and 6 should be interchanged. This, however, would destroy the narrative structure of the signs.

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AbstractThe Greek term ἀρχή occurs in John 2:11, at the end of the story of the wedding at Cana. Water was changed into wine at this occasion and this is called the “beginning of the signs”. This Greek term—often translated in this context not as “beginning of the signs” but rather as “first sign”—can denote the beginning of a dynamically structured sequence. Elements in the narratives of the various signs seem to build a dynamic structure, thereby assigning each sign a fixed position in a climactic story which ends with the raising of Lazarus. This has consequences for literary criticism of the Gospel of John. It is widely held that chapters 5 and 6 should be interchanged. This, however, would destroy the narrative structure of the signs.

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2014-01-15
2017-10-22

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