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Nematode infection patterns in four sympatric lizards from a restinga habitat (Jurubatiba) in Rio de Janeiro state, southeastern Brazil

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Specimens of the four most abundant diurnal lizards (Tropidurus torquatus, Cnemidophorus littoralis, Mabuya macrorhyncha and M. agilis) inhabiting the restinga of Jurubatiba, Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil were examined for nematodes. Eight species of nematodes were found. Tropidurus torquatus had the richest (8 species) and most diverse nematode fauna, whereas that of C. littoralis was the poorest (2 species) and less diverse. Tropidurus torquatus also had the highest overall prevalence (92%) and mean infection intensity (37.2; standard deviation 82.0; range 2-549). Similarities in nematode faunal composition between host species was generally low, except between the two Mabuya species.

Affiliations: 1: Setor de Ecologia, DBAV, I. Biologia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, R. São Francisco Xavier 524, 20550-013, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil; Pós-Graduação em Ecologia, Departamento de Zoologia, IB, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, C.P. 6109, 13081-970, Campinas, SP, Brazil; 2: Setor de Ecologia, DBAV, I. Biologia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, R. São Francisco Xavier 524, 20550-013, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil; Pós-Graduação em Ecologia, Departamento de Zoologia, IB, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, C.P. 6109, 13081-970, Campinas, SP, Brazil; 3: Departamento de Helmintologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, 21045-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil; 4: Setor de Ecologia, DBAV, I. Biologia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, R. São Francisco Xavier 524, 20550-013, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil e-mail: cfdrocha@uerj.br 2 Pós-Graduação em Ecologia, Departamento de Zoologia, IB, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, C.P. 6109, 13081-970, Campinas, SP, Brazil; 5: Setor de Ecologia, DBAV, I. Biologia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, R. São Francisco Xavier 524, 20550-013, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil; Pós-Graduação em Ecologia, Departamento de Zoologia, IB, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, C.P. 6109, 13081-970, Campinas, SP, Brazil; 6: Setor de Ecologia, DBAV, I. Biologia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, R. São Francisco Xavier 524, 20550-013, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil; Pós-Graduação em Ecologia, Departamento de Zoologia, IB, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, C.P. 6109, 13081-970, Campinas, SP, Brazil

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/content/journals/10.1163/156853800507507
2000-07-01
2016-12-03

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