Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Description of the tadpole of Leptodactylus syphax, with a comparison of morphological and ecological characters of tadpoles and adults of the species in the L. pentadactylus group (Leptodactylidae, Anura)

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Amphibia-Reptilia

Leptodactylus syphax belongs to the L. pentadactylus group, one of five species groups defined for the genus. The tadpole of L. syphax develops in lotic habitats, as do the tadpoles of L. lithonaetes and L. rugosus. The tadpole of L. syphax is here described and differs from the tadpole of L. rugosus by having a less flattened and larger body, from the tadpole of L. lithonaetes by having a larger body in relation to total length and a larger oral disc in relation to body length. Further, it differs from the tadpole of L. rhodomystax by its color, body shape in dorsal profile and mouth shape, and from the tadpole of L. rhodonotus by its body shape in dorsal profile and spiracle position. A cluster analysis of several morphological and ecological features of adults and tadpoles from the species of the L. pentadactylus group grouped L. syphax with L. rhodomystax and L. rhodonotus, species with chest spines, moderate body size, relatively small head, unbarred lips, tadpoles with five tooth rows and aquatic development. The remaining species of the L. pentadactylus group were distributed among four additional clusters.

Affiliations: 1: Departamento de Zoologia and Museu de História Natural, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970 Campinas, São Paulo, Brasil 2 Present address: Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 30161-970 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil e-mail: ecpaula@mono.icb.ufmg.br; 2: Departamento de Zoologia and Museu de História Natural, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970 Campinas, São Paulo, Brasil 2 Present address: Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 30161-970 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil e-mail: ecpaula@mono.icb.ufmg.br

Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853800507534
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156853800507534
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853800507534
2000-07-01
2016-12-07

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Amphibia-Reptilia — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation