Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

Testing the phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis in male Moor Frogs (Rana arvalis) exhibiting a conspicuous nuptial colouration

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

The conspicuous blue nuptial colouration of Moor Frog (Rana arvalis) males has been associated with sexual selection; it may provide females with information about benefits to be gained through mate choice. Here we investigated the phenotype-linked fertility hypothesis suggesting that exaggerated traits may advertise fertilization ability. We evaluated conspicuousness of males' colouration and related this to the number of sperm stored in their testes. Contrary to our expectation, we did not find a positive relationship between blueness of males and the number of sperm stored in the testes. We discuss this result in the light of alternative traits that may be advertised by colouration, such as sperm quality or good genes for offspring survival. We now need direct studies of female mate choice and the physiology of the blue nuptial colouration to clarify the evolutionary background of the striking temporal sexual dichromatism in the Moor Frog.

Affiliations: 1: Konrad Lorenz Institute for Ethology, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Savoyenstrasse 1A, 1160 Vienna, Austria, Behavioural Ecology Group, Department of Systematic Zoology and Ecology, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmány Péter sétány 1/C, 1117 Budapest, Hungary;, Email: hettyeyattila@yahoo.de; 2: Behavioural Ecology Group, Department of Systematic Zoology and Ecology, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmány Péter sétány 1/C, 1117 Budapest, Hungary, Ecological Genetics Research Unit, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 65, 00014 Finland; 3: Konrad Lorenz Institute for Ethology, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Savoyenstrasse 1A, 1160 Vienna, Austria

Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853809789647086
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156853809789647086
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853809789647086
2009-10-01
2016-12-05

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Amphibia-Reptilia — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation