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Summer microhabitat use of the Greater Siren (Siren lacertina) and Two-toed Amphiuma (Amphiuma means) in an isolated wetland

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Although the habitats of the Greater Siren (Siren lacertina) and Two-toed Amphiuma (Amphiuma means) have been described on a coarse scale; the microhabitat(s) of these species has not been examined. We trapped from 12 June 2008 to 1 July 2008 in an isolated wetland on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina where these two salamander species occur in sympatry. Traps were set in three different microhabitats; the water's surface and benthic zone in deep water, and in a littoral zone. Siren lacertina captures were highest in the benthic zone, while A. means were captured more in the littoral zone. This differentiation in microhabitat usage may reflect a difference in prey availability or habitat structure; alternatively, it may be a response to interspecific interactions between species.

Affiliations: 1: Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E, Aiken, South Carolina 29802, USA, Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, 210 Nagle Hall, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843-2258, USA;, Email: cschalk@tamu.edu; 2: Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E, Aiken, South Carolina 29802, USA, Division of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri, 105 Tucker Hall, Columbia, Missouri 65211, USA; 3: Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E, Aiken, South Carolina 29802, USA

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/content/journals/10.1163/156853810791069155
2010-04-01
2016-12-11

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