Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

FORAGING TRADE-OFFS AND PREDATOR INSPECTION IN AN OSTARIOPHYSAN FISH: SWITCHING FROM CHEMICAL TO VISUAL CUES

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Behaviour

Under laboratory conditions, we investigated the presence of a foraging trade-off in the chemical predator inspection behaviour of finescale dace (Chrosomus neogaeus). Dace were fed ad libitum, or food deprived for 24 or 48 hours and allowed to inspect a live yellow perch (Perca flavescens) in the presence of the chemical cues of a perch fed dace (with alarm pheromone) or swordtails (Xiphophorus helleri; without alarm pheromones). Dace exposed to the odour of a perch fed swordtails exhibited no evidence of a trade-off in either anti-predator behaviour or predator inspection behaviour. When fed ad libitum and exposed to the odour of a perch fed dace, individuals exhibited significantly greater anti-predator behaviour (increased shoaling, decreased area use and greater frequency of dashing and freezing behaviour) when compared to the swordtail diet control. Predator inspection behaviour was also significantly affected (increased latency to inspect and minimum distance approached towards the predator and fewer inspectors per visit). However, when food deprived for 24 or 48 hours, dace exhibited no differences in either anti-predator or predator inspection behaviour when exposed to the odour of perch fed dace versus perch fed swordtails. These data demonstrate that predator inspection behaviour based on the chemical cues of a potential predator is subject to foraging trade-offs and that individual prey may reduce their overall risk of predation by increasing the use of visual cues.

10.1163/156853900502015
/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502015
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
10
5
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502015
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502015
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502015
2000-02-01
2017-08-17

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Behaviour — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation