Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

ARE DUNG FLIES IDEAL-FREE DISTRIBUTED AT THEIR OVIPOSITION AND MATING SITE?

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Behaviour

We experimentally tested the ideal-free distribution (IFD) using oviposition sites and mates as resources. We asked whether (1) female dung flies are distributed in an ideal-free manner among various fresh dung pats (the mating site and their resource for oviposition), and whether (2) the males are distributed likewise and consequently (3) ideal-free distributed with regard to the number of females. The last prediction links the IFD to the operational sex ratio (OSR), the number of competing males per receptive female. The flies were simultaneously offered six fresh dung pats in their natural environment, arrayed in a small and a large equalsided triangle. In one experiment all dung pats were the same size, and in another the three dung pats in each triangle had different surface areas. The large and mobile yellow dung fly, Scathophaga stercoraria, was overall evenly distributed with regard to oviposition sites and mates, whereas the distribution of the smaller and less mobile Sepsis cynipsea deviated randomly from the IFD. More flies were attracted to larger pats, but not in proportion to the pat's surface area (undermatching). Based on the speed at which an IFD was approached, individuals did not appear to sample different pats. The differences between the two species in agreement with the IFD predictions are probably quantitative rather than qualitative, relating to differences in mobility and local distribution.

10.1163/156853900502051
/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502051
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502051
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502051
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502051
2000-02-01
2016-12-07

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Behaviour — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation