Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

VIGILANCE IN BRONZE MANNIKIN GROUPS: THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF PREDATION RISK AND INTRA-GROUP COMPETITION

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Behaviour

We describe foraging behaviour and time budgets of the gregarious bronze mannikin, Lonchura cucullata. In addition to being the first such study of a southern African granivore, this was the first study of a group-forager to differentiate between vigilance for other flock members (conspecifics) and vigilance for predators. We verified a perception of predation risk by placing five feeders at increasing distances from cover. The mean number of birds at a feeder decreased significantly with increasing distance from cover. We manipulated levels of aggression by restricting access to random numbers of feeding holes at various distances. The treatments succeeded in forcing birds to feed further from cover, and by inference, increased levels of aggression. We measured time budgets with focal samples on marked individuals. There was no influence of group size on time budgets. There was a non-significant (p < 0.06) trend for vigilance to increase with increasing distance from cover (predation risk). There was no pattern in the relative vigilance for predators as opposed to vigilance for other flock members (conspecifics), either with group size, distance from cover, or manipulated levels of aggression. Despite our inability to detect patterns of vigilance for other flock members, we emphasize the importance of studies to elucidate such a process.

Affiliations: 1: School of Life and Environmental Science, George Campbell Building, University of Natal, Durban 4041, South Africa

10.1163/156853900502213
/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502213
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502213
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502213
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502213
2000-05-01
2016-12-07

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Behaviour — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation