Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

INFLUENCE OF INSECT ASSOCIATED CUES ON THE JUMPING BEHAVIOR OF ENTOMOPATHOGENIC NEMATODES (STEINERNEMA SPP.)

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.
Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the Brill platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. MyBook is a cheap paperback edition of the original book and will be sold at uniform, low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites

image of Behaviour

The infective stage juveniles of insect parasitic nematodes in the family Steinernema search for hosts using strategies ranging from ambush to cruise foraging. Infective juveniles attach to passing insects by standing on their tails and contacting an insect directly when standing or by jumping. We determined how species with differing degrees of ambush foraging specialization differ in their behavioral responses to different sources of information. Mechanical contact, air movement, and host associated volatile cues were important triggers of jumping behavior for some species of Steinernema. Three species that are ambush foragers (S. carpocapsae, S. scapterisci, and S. siamkayai) responded to small air movements by increased waving and jumping behavior, and jumps were directionally biased towards the source of the movement. For S. carpocapsae and S. scapterisci, host-associated volatile cues were strong triggers to jump, but host cues did not increase the proportion of S. siamkayai jumping. In contrast, two intermediate foraging species, S. ceratophorum and S. monticolum, did not demonstrate a detectable response to either the air movement or the host cues.

Affiliations: 1: Department of Entomology and Department of Nematology, University of California - Davis, Davis, California 95616, USA

10.1163/156853900502231
/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502231
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502231
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502231
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502231
2000-05-01
2016-07-27

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation