Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

THE EFFECTS OF SPATIAL CONTEXT AND SOCIAL EXPERIENCE ON THE TERRITORIAL AGGRESSION OF MALE THREESPINE STICKLEBACK

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Behaviour

1. Territorial male threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, attacked their neighbors more and escaped from their neighbors less when at their own nests than when at their neighbors' nests. In this study, attacks decreased gradually and escape attempts increased gradually as males moved from the center to the edge of their territories.

2. As predicted by the conflict hypothesis, males performed head-down threat displays most at their territory boundaries. The conflict hypothesis holds that aggression and fear are two opposing tendencies that regulate the expression of attack and escape behavior.

3. This experiment did not find evidence for a threshold effect of aggression or fear in which new behaviors would abruptly replace attack or escape once a certain level of motivation had been activated.

4. Males in our study that had social experience outside of their territories, either fighting with a rival or spending time with a sympatric heterospecific, made fewer attacks overall in later encounters with their neighbors in their and their neighbors' territories than did males without social experience. This finding demonstrates that the influence of encounter site on territorial aggression is modified by a male's past experience.

5. Males with winning and losing experiences outside of their territories did not respond differently to their neighbors in later encounters.

Affiliations: 1: Department of Biology and Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA.

10.1163/156853900502493
/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502493
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502493
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502493
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502493
2000-07-01
2016-12-09

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Behaviour — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation