Cookies Policy
X

This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse the site you are agreeing to our use of cookies.

I accept this policy

Find out more here

FEMALE RED THROAT COLORATION IN TWO POPULATIONS OF THREESPINE STICKLEBACK

No metrics data to plot.
The attempt to load metrics for this article has failed.
The attempt to plot a graph for these metrics has failed.
The full text of this article is not currently available.

Brill’s MyBook program is exclusively available on BrillOnline Books and Journals. Students and scholars affiliated with an institution that has purchased a Brill E-Book on the BrillOnline platform automatically have access to the MyBook option for the title(s) acquired by the Library. Brill MyBook is a print-on-demand paperback copy which is sold at a favorably uniform low price.

Access this article

+ Tax (if applicable)
Add to Favorites
You must be logged in to use this functionality

image of Behaviour

In a population of stream-resident stickleback from British Columbia, females frequently have orange-red throats which are conspicuous to the human eye and, according to two straightforward physical measures of coloration, are more intensely red than the throats of anadromous females. Stream and anadromous males from these populations, however, do not differ for a reflectance-based index of red chroma. This suggests that exceptional female red coloration in the stream population has not evolved as a byproduct of the evolution of exceptional coloration in males. In contrast to results for female lateral barring in another threespine stickleback population, red is not strongly associated with reproductive readiness and unlikely to function strictly as a signal of readiness to mate. Larger stream females have more intensely red throats though this pattern was significant only in one year and according to one technique. With these findings and the extensive literature already available for this species, the threespine stickleback becomes a promising model system for studying the evolution of female secondary sexual characters in species with conventional sexual dimorphism.

Affiliations: 1: Department of Biological Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Whitewater, USA.; 2: Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, USA.

10.1163/156853900502556
/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502556
dcterms_title,pub_keyword,dcterms_description,pub_author
6
3
Loading
Loading

Full text loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502556
Loading

Data & Media loading...

http://brill.metastore.ingenta.com/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502556
Loading

Article metrics loading...

/content/journals/10.1163/156853900502556
2000-07-01
2016-12-08

Sign-in

Can't access your account?
  • Tools

  • Add to Favorites
  • Printable version
  • Email this page
  • Subscribe to ToC alert
  • Get permissions
  • Recommend to your library

    You must fill out fields marked with: *

    Librarian details
    Your details
    Why are you recommending this title?
    Select reason:
     
    Behaviour — Recommend this title to your library
  • Export citations
  • Key

  • Full access
  • Open Access
  • Partial/No accessInformation